Radiocarbon dating the shroud of turin

07-Feb-2020 14:54 by 10 Comments

Radiocarbon dating the shroud of turin

In January 2011, over two decades after the momentous Nature (1) article dating the Shroud of Turin to between 12, one of the original authors was back on the debate's front lines.

The publication is brief but radical, illustrated with seven photos with a few French words to make the point, that say: “a picture is worth a thousand words (proverb)".I don't claim to have even come close to resolving all of the difficulties.But I think I can clarify some points, with a lot still unsettled. The fact that the garbled numbers we have seem so easily explainable is significant.As he explained to Sciences et Avenir, it is "a piece of the shroud sample, which his Tucson laboratory received on 14 April 1988” - which he had cut, set aside and assumed something of a caretaker role for.For the first 1988 analyses, the Vatican had permitted only a few milligrams of the shroud to be taken for analysis by three laboratories, in Tucson (USA), Zurich (Switzerland) and Oxford (England). These results therefore provide conclusive evidence that the linen of the Shroud of Turin is mediaeval. The radiocarbon measurements were done, not at one laboratory, but at three highly regarded institutions. The results provide not just evidence but conclusive evidence. Finally Ray Rogers, who had accepted the carbon dating, decided to disprove a crazy explanation from what he called the lunatic fringe.

After the results had been leaked, twenty-one scientists from the University of Oxford, the University of Arizona, the Institut für Mittelenergiephysik in Zurich, Columbia University, and the British Museum wrote in a peer-reviewed paper published in Nature in 1989: The results of radiocarbon measurements at Arizona, Oxford and Zurich yield a calibrated calendar age range with at least 95% confidence for the linen of the Shroud of Turin of AD 1260 - 1390 (rounded down/up to nearest 10 yr).

Director of the University of Arizona laboratory in Tucson, Arizona in the United States – one of three laboratories the Vatican selected to perform the 1988 analyses – he has published new analyses in the peer-reviewed journal Radiocarbon (2) which Sciences et Avenir has been able to read prior to publication.

They aim to finally halt the steady criticisms since the dating that suddenly dashed the hopes of those touting the cloth's authenticity; it is claimed that it is the very shroud in which the body of Jesus Christ was wrapped after his crucifixion. The italian translation of the article by Sciences et Avenir. Timothy Jull, a long-standing figure in the story and in a privileged position for playing the part, today brought out major artillery…12.39 milligrams of linen, measuring only 0.5 cm by 1 cm.

It is suggested that steps should be taken to conserve the shroud and that permission should be given for its examination by experts in medieval art.

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Although of negligible scientific value, they represent a major public triumph for the AMS method of carbon dating.